Snowboard Instructor Systems - CASI, APSI, AASI, NZSIA & more

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ilolwhat - 04 September 2013 09:09 PM

I’m definitely going to take my CASI this winter while in whistler. Are there many job opportunities in say perisher for a level 1 instructor?

For sure. I think with the right attitude and enthusiasm, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be able to get a job at Perisher (or anywhere else). If you are passionate about teaching, and you bring energy to the course/interview/job, nothing should stand in your way.

 
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ilolwhat - 04 September 2013 09:09 PM

I’m definitely going to take my CASI this winter while in whistler. Are there many job opportunities in say perisher for a level 1 instructor?

Good man, go for it. Btw you’re asking the right guy lol. I work for both Perisher and Whistler, so I’ll see you there!

I can’t really get you a job, that part you will have to do on your own. But I can help out with any questions you have.

So the deal is, when u get your Level 1s in Whistler you won’t be able to work for them straight away. CASI runs independently to Whistler and Whis is Canada’s top resort so it’s not easy to get a job. It took me a while to earn that jacket.
To work in Whistler these days, you need a minimum level 2 and have a reasonable amount of time teaching.

Perisher is a different story.
Though Perisher is Australia’s biggest resort… it’s still Australia. So it’s not nearly as competitive.

2 ways you could get into Perisher Snow Sports School:

1. Do the hiring clinic, hopefully get hired and they will train you and Perisher pays for your APSI level 1 course (you only pay for the exam at the end). Pretty sweet deal actually. I wish I knew about this when I started.

2. Get your CASI level 1s like you said in Whistler. Then apply for a job, do the hiring clinic and hopefully get hired.

*Note* I did my CASI level one’s in Whistler, worked a season in Manning Park in Canada, had already worked for Perisher in Lift Ops. for 3 seasons and they STILL made me do the hiring clinic LOL . SO, the hiring clinic is gunna happen for you no matter what.

They are your 2 best options dude. Also if you decide to go the CASI route, come see me in whistler. If we get a day off together in Whis, I’m always riding park or pow on my days off but I don’t mind taking you for a few laps. Or just book me for a lesson and I can train you up properly. I should (fingers crossed) finish my level 3s by then and if so, my boss is going to make me an Instructor Trainer in Perisher next season. So I can get you exam ready for sure. I love preparing candidates like yourself for exams. I spent all day getting my gf ready for her APSI level 1s today.

If you want to be an instructor, and you do everything you have to do to get there. You will!  metal

 
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Andy Aitken - 05 September 2013 05:36 PM

To work in Whistler these days, you need a minimum level 2 and have a reasonable amount of time teaching.

Really? Even with Whistler Kids? Is this only for international instructors? I’m only questioning this as it never used to be the case.

I’ve had my level 2 since 2006, so I’m a bit out of the loop in regards to the hiring process, but I’ve definitely worked with a lot of instructors who have only had their level 1. Also, there’s always a bunch of rookie instructors working for WB.

I will ask Michelle (my fiancee) as she was a supervisor a couple of season ago and knows the hiring process really well. Maybe I’ll get her to reply here. It wouldn’t surprise me if they’ve become a bit stricter since the GFC, as visitor numbers dropped considerably a few years ago.

 
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You guys are awesome, I’m never let down by the quality of the responses I get here!

@Andy I’ll definitely take you up on that offer for a couple of laps! I would like to do my CASI, because from what I’ve heard and read its a little more respected than its Australian counterpart.

I’ve been teaching beginner through advanced taekwondo for the last 5 years so I think once I know and understand all the material my teaching goals of 2014 will be seriously underway! shaka

Could anyone shed some light on the whole process for the hiring clinic @ perisher?

and what about Whistler being that much more competitive?

Thanks!!

 
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Whistler gets a lot of international travellers, especially Australian so the hiring process is competitive. You don’t have to have your Casi level 2 to be hired, but all depends on who else has applied for the job. They don’t necessarily hire a level 2 instructor with no experience over a level 1 instructor with seasons of experience. Experience has a lot of pull in Whistler. 

I would suggest doing a season in Perisher before heading to Whistler as your chances of getting hired will be greater with previous experience.

Whistler is a great place to work. I have worked as an instructor for almost 10 years and love it. You meet great people and end up leaving with long-term friends. The pay isn’t as much as Perisher but the classes are smaller and there is lot more terrain to work with.

Also your previous teaching experience with taekwondo will increase your chances of getting hired, as long as you have a qualification to go along with it.

I hope this helps you and good luck.

 
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Last season I tried to apply with CASI level 1, they said for international applicants they want you to have CASI level 2 to teach there.

 
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Just Giver - 06 September 2013 04:07 AM

Whistler gets a lot of international travellers, especially Australian so the hiring process is competitive. You don’t have to have your Casi level 2 to be hired, but all depends on who else has applied for the job. They don’t necessarily hire a level 2 instructor with no experience over a level 1 instructor with seasons of experience. Experience has a lot of pull in Whistler. 

I would suggest doing a season in Perisher before heading to Whistler as your chances of getting hired will be greater with previous experience.

Whistler is a great place to work. I have worked as an instructor for almost 10 years and love it. You meet great people and end up leaving with long-term friends. The pay isn’t as much as Perisher but the classes are smaller and there is lot more terrain to work with.

Also your previous teaching experience with taekwondo will increase your chances of getting hired, as long as you have a qualification to go along with it.

I hope this helps you and good luck.

Thanks Michelle.  kissing_heart

What Michelle said here is really important. You need to do what you can to set yourself ahead of the pack.

Here is some general advice that could potentially help you:

<li>Enthusiasm. Show you want to be there. Show them how much this job means to you.</li>
<li>Experience working with kids or teaching other sports. List ALL experience in your resume.</li>
<li>Experience teaching snowboarding (or skiing) counts for a lot, as Michelle mentioned.</li>
<li>A desire to continue your training and certifications. Make this known to them!</li>
<li>Sell yourself. This is a job interview. Show them WHY they should hire you instead of the next guy.</li>
<li>Having all your documentation in order: work visa, resume, bank accounts. Show them you’re organised and ready to work!</li>
<li>Do whatever you can to get your “foot in the door”. Everything becomes a lot easier after that.</li>

 
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rider26 - 05 September 2013 09:10 PM
Andy Aitken - 05 September 2013 05:36 PM

To work in Whistler these days, you need a minimum level 2 and have a reasonable amount of time teaching.

Really? Even with Whistler Kids? Is this only for international instructors? I’m only questioning this as it never used to be the case.

Yep, I’m applying now and the rules are you must be a level 2 with experience to apply, even for whis kids.
I had to do the whole application rather than just return staff, cause I went to Japan last year instead.

I got in as a level 1 in 2010 on a technicality. I asked them how I can get into Whistler Snow Sports and they said “Do a season in a smaller resort in canada, do a season in aus, become a dual cert and then we’ll talk”.

So I did all that, then emailed them and told them. They just laughed and gave me a job LOL

 
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Haha nice one. wink

 

Super thread revive here.

Are you still instructing at whis this season? I’m keen to see if I have the riding skillz to pass level 1 CASI.

 
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Yep, it’s been 3 years since this thread was used but yes I am still teaching in Whistler. I did end up passing my level 3s and I’ve since been trained as an evaluator so if you do your course in Whis… I might be the one running it wink

Sorry I can’t go easy on anyone I know. The standards are the standards. Happy to answer any questions though.

Actually I have a question to ask.

You mentioned you want to see if your riding skills pass level 1. Do you want to become an instructor or are you just looking to improve your riding with the course?

 

Looking to get level 1.

Do people just do the course and not actually sit the exam?

And of course I don’t expect anyone to go easy on an exam for anyone they know for any course.

I’m just wanting to know if I would pass the riding (pretty confident I could, just don’t want to pay for the exam and fail) And how much of it is riding switch/switch skills aka skating, unloading etc.

And in the exam is the teaching part requiring you to ‘teach’ other prospective level 1s?

 
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The course and exam are together for the level 1. Separate at higher levels.

What I was actually asking was do you intend to become an instructor or are you just looking to improve your riding?

There is reasonable amounts of switch involved. The last course I ran, we also got the candidates to skate/do 1 foot turns etc with their wrong foot strapped in to make it realistic for the candidate who was practising teaching lessons.

And yes, you will be required to teach 3 lessons to the other candidates. They will be your students to practice with. Hence they will be switch one foot so their riding is actually awkward/off balance instead of faking it. Or for higher level lessons we will ask them to ride certain ways in hopes that you notice and can give them ways to fix the thing they are “having trouble with”

 
Andy Aitken - 26 January 2016 03:40 PM

The course and exam are together for the level 1. Separate at higher levels.

What I was actually asking was do you intend to become an instructor or are you just looking to improve your riding?

There is reasonable amounts of switch involved. The last course I ran, we also got the candidates to skate/do 1 foot turns etc with their wrong foot strapped in to make it realistic for the candidate who was practising teaching lessons.

And yes, you will be required to teach 3 lessons to the other candidates. They will be your students to practice with. Hence they will be switch one foot so their riding is actually awkward/off balance instead of faking it. Or for higher level lessons we will ask them to ride certain ways in hopes that you notice and can give them ways to fix the thing they are “having trouble with”

I’m hopefully looking in to become an instructor. ALWAYS looking to improve my riding.

So is switch riding assessed or is it used as training aid in a way for the candidate ‘running’ the lesson?
Either way I’ll be riding a lot of switch this weekend and doing flatland tricks, maybe on sunday/monday I’ll venture into the hitting features in the park switch.

 

 
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There’s no park involved in level 1 (don’t let that stop you having fun in the park though, it all helps).

The switch riding is not only for teaching but will be part of the rider improvement sessions as well.
It’s not an absolute “you must ride switch perfectly to pass” but if we see you riding switch with reasonable control it will help our overall view of your riding. Also practising switch before your exams will challenge your stance and help to centre you in your normal direction too.

The 3 basic competencies are:
- Centred and mobile position (centred on the board but able to move and adapt to terrain, manoeuvres etc)
- Turning with the lower body (turning starts from the hips and knees mostly at level 1)
- Balanced over the working edge (are you always stacking your weight over the edge you’re using?)

Keep those 3 things in mind when practising because that’s a big part of the riding standard for level 1.

Have fun out there!