Camber Profiles: Camber vs Rocker vs Flat vs Hybrids

Avatar

Maybe ya need this pic of ya at the start of the article, Jez????? Bein an Engineer and all!!!!!  wink

 
Avatar

cool hmm

LOL

 
Avatar

Can someone tell me which camber profile Forum’s “Chillydog with pop” fits into, please? And also whether it might suit a beginner who doesn’t yet know what style of riding they will be into, but is keen to learn basic freestyle.

 
Avatar

Pretty sure its a full rocker!!!!! (hence its name, like a bent hot dog)

I’m def no instructor, but I think a beginner will benifit more by learnin on a cambered board first!!!!!

 
Avatar

Why would they benefit more on a cambered board?

 
Avatar

I think being on reverse camber is way better and easier… just my 2c shaka

 
Avatar

I’ve heard that it teaches better edge control!!!!!

 
Avatar

I guess the question is whether riding a reverse camber will be “bad” for his riding. I’ve seen discussion on here with people saying it allows you to take shortcuts with your technique when initiating turns, which may harm development of your carving technique in the long run….but I guess it all depends where you want to head with your riding….and at this point this bloke has no idea, he just wants to learn and have some fun….so I’m guessing that it probably doesn’t matter.

 
Avatar

Both answers are correct really. Rockered boards are easier to learn on, thus making the experience more fun, which gives the rider more confidence etc. Cambered boards require better technique to turn the board, so it makes them into a stronger rider right from the start. If a beginner is learning on a cambered board, I would suggest a board with a fairly soft flex pattern. Both options have their advantages and disadvantages.

 
Avatar

Cheers, rider. Atm we’re looking at a Forum Manual (Chillydog with pop) for him.

 
Avatar
rider26 - 06 July 2012 02:24 AM

Rockered boards are easier to learn on, thus making the experience more fun, which gives the rider more confidence etc.

Having gone through the experience with beesekay, I’m of the opinion that not only are rockered boards FAR better for learning on, it’s advisable to go for a 3 degree base bevel as well. It can mean the difference between a total beginner giving up after their first try, or getting that magic stoke.

rider26 - 06 July 2012 02:24 AM

Cambered boards require better technique to turn the board, so it makes them into a stronger rider right from the start.

Yep, once they’ve got their confidence linking turns at speed, THEN get ‘em on a cambered board

 
chucky - 17 August 2012 11:16 AM
rider26 - 06 July 2012 02:24 AM

Rockered boards are easier to learn on, thus making the experience more fun, which gives the rider more confidence etc.

Having gone through the experience with beesekay, I’m of the opinion that not only are rockered boards FAR better for learning on, it’s advisable to go for a 3 degree base bevel as well. It can mean the difference between a total beginner giving up after their first try, or getting that magic stoke.

rider26 - 06 July 2012 02:24 AM

Cambered boards require better technique to turn the board, so it makes them into a stronger rider right from the start.

Yep, once they’ve got their confidence linking turns at speed, THEN get ‘em on a cambered board

Do you reckon its worth switching from rocker to a cambered board after say 2 decent seasons?... i’m sceptical because i don’t want to find i hate it…

 
Avatar

Definitely give it a go. Maybe try one at a demo before you commit to buying one. You will find cambered boards are more stable, with more energy and pop. They also carve and hold an edge better than rockered boards. I strongly advice you to try different boards so you can feel the difference and make an informed decision based on your personal riding style.

Welcome to Boardworld, jaspy94. shaka

 
Avatar

Shit this post could be really embarrassing if i am wrong.

BUT i def think the Burton Flying V was critical to my success on a board at the shred last year.

I had a break through on that Board.

I think cambered boards were a detriment to me!

(i hope I am correct in assuming the flying V is a Rockered board?)

 
Avatar

The Burton Flying V is a hybrid camber profile; rocker between the feet, camber under the feet, rocker nose and tail. For sure you would have felt it was easier to turn than a full cambered board.

HYBRID (TYPE A):

The hybrid camber profile seen below features rocker between the feet and camber directly underneath the feet. Many snowboard companies use this profile under various names, including Burton’s Flying V, Lib Tech’s C2 Banana, Nitro’s Gullwing Camber, and many others. The benefit of this particular camber profile is versatility; it provides ‘looseness’ due to rocker between the feet and float in powder for the same reason. While camber under the feet gives edge hold and some degree of stability and pop, however not as much a full cambered board. Most riders say this particular hybrid profile feels more like a rockered board than a cambered board.

Advantages: Versatile, loose feel and easy turning, floats well in powder, provides better edge hold and pop than full rocker.

Disadvantages: Can feel unstable on rails, not as stable at speeds as full camber.